Games in a nutshell

Games in a nutshell

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– [Voiceover] This video
has been produced to help sport leaders like yourself
become familiar with the setting up and running of
the Small Team Games program. the games shown here are
simple to play and easy to organise. Make sure the area that you use is safe and clear of any hazards. Most of the games use the normal 40 by 30 metre field. When setting out your sports markers be consistent with the
colours of the markers. Here we’re using yellow for the corners, white for halfway and goals
are indicated using red and green. It’s also a good practice
that each team wears different coloured vests. Remember, be consistent with your colours. Your job here as sports
leader is to explain how the games are played,
get the games started, and act as the referee or umpire. You may remember from the
Small Team Games video that choosing the team
is very important because we don’t want to make
anyone feel that they are last to be chosen. There are a few ways of doing this. – [Voiceover] I’m gonna
give you guys a number. One, two, one, two,
one, two, one, two, one. All the ones go every here and all the twos go over there. – [Voiceover] Also a good way
to decide which team starts playing is to get a member of each team to guess what hand you’re
holding the whistle in. Slick Crick. Slick Crick is a simple
game for eight players. It’s similar to tip and run cricket. After the batter hits the ball, runs are made by running
between the wicket and a cone placed halfway down the pitch. A sport leader sets up a
wicket at one end and a cone about 12 paces away at the other end. Another cone is placed
about halfway between the wicket and the cone. The batter hits the ball from the tee. The fielders stand next to the markers that are placed in a
semi-circle about 10 metres out from the wicket. The fielding team must keep
outside the semi-circle until the ball is hit. Only then can they come inside. The wicket keeper sets
up a ball on the tee. The batter hits it. The batter keeps scoring runs by running from the wicket to the middle cone until the ball is thrown
back to the wicket keeper. The other team is fielding. Each batter gets two turns at hitting. When the batter has finished, each player rotates one fielding position. See how they’re changing places. The umpire, sports
leader, keeps the score. Be careful if you hit a
good ball and get called out on the full. You loose three runs from your run total. Next batter please. Let’s check out the rules again. One, three by three rule
applies to fielders. Two, batter keeps running until ball is returned to the tee. Three, fielders can
only move after the ball has been hit. (whistle blows) Speed Ball. The idea of Speed Ball is
to pass the ball between your team members and
score goals by catching the ball whilst in the opposition’s goal area. Set up the normal 40 by 30 metre field. We’re not using goals in this video, but you can use portable goals or markers. When the teams have been
chosen and briefed on the rules, the referee starts the game with a centre throw in from the sideline. – Ready? (whistle blows) – [Voiceover] Already we have
a dropped ball by the greens. This means the reds have possession now. oh, look even this blocking put up by the greens player doesn’t seem to slow them down, and after their fouth pass, oh they have their first goal! Well done! Congratulations. After a team scores a goal, the other team restarts the game from the centre with an opening pass to
the side or to the back. Oh green is looking
good here and moving up towards the goal line. Oh, nice interception, but you have to hold onto it. A dropped ball by the reds. Look at that, a nice quick
restart by the greens. They need to get to the
other end of the field fast. Here’s a big throw, but what’s this? Oh look! The reds have it again! Good quality blocking here. A great intercept. The greens seem to be in
control of this stage. Moving the ball around nicely now. Yes their skills pay off with
an excellent speed ball goal. The game is restarted by the reds. They’re passing well with players trying to position themselves
to receive the ball. Oh look out! A bit of a fumble there. The ref wants to play on. Oh, bad luck! That ball has gone out off of a red player so it’s a green throw in. Oh, look out! This should be a foul. This is a no contact game. – No contact. – [Voiceover] Good call
by the referee there. – [Voiceover] Do it
again and I’ll sub you. – [Voiceover] The ref has the
power to substitute any player guilty of a foul. Also, the ref can sub
people at different times so everyone gets a go. Let’s look at a couple of examples where the ball is being put out of play. Here we can see the
reds passing for a goal, but the pass is high and is missed. That will be a throw in by the greens from their goal line. In this play, red have gone for a goal, but the ball has been intercepted and knocked over the line by green. – Red corner. – [Voiceover] This means a corner throw in for the reds. Oh yeah, with a scoreboard level at one all it’s about time the reds
put themselves in the lead. The players are positioning
themselves well and passing is accurate. If they can just keep, oh look! Yes! They’re over! Congratulations two goals to one. They’re back. With the greens wanting
to settle the score, it looks like we have a game on our hands. Let’s check out the rules again. One, three by three rule applies. No offside. Two, dropped ball, change possession. Three, ball over the sideline,
other team throws in. Four, if a goal attempt is missed, defender team throws in from goal line. Five, ball knocked over goal line, attacking team takes corner throw in. (whistle blows) Two Base Tee Ball. Two Base Tee Ball is a fun
game for two teams to play. It’s very easy and very popular. The sport leader uses the cones to set up a triangle or V shape. It’s not a diamond because
you leave out second base. First base is 12 paces from
home base, and third base is also 12 paces from home base. The tee is set up at the home base. Also, set up a semi-circle
of white cones for the fielding perimeter. The fielders should be arranged in a rough semi-circle behind the white cones. When everyone is ready,
the ref presses the ball on the tee and the first batter has a hit. The batter runs to first
base, then third base, and home. If the ball is still not
returned, the batter can continue running until it is. (whistle blows) – Five runs. – [Voiceover] Each team
member gets two consecutive hits at the ball. Teams get a point for
each base that is passed. The ref will keep count
so you better be quick. By the way, don’t get
called out on the full or you’ll lose three points
off your team’s score. As usual, we apply the
three by three rule. Fielders can’t take more
than three steps while returning the ball, and
the ball must be thrown at least three times to other
players before the ball can be given to the umpire. Let’s have a look at those rules again. One, fielding team must use
the three by three rule. Two, batter keeps running until
ball is returned to umpire. Three, caught on the full, three points deducted from team score. Four, fielders remain
behind white markers until ball is hit from tee. Five, batter must hit ball
between first and third base. (whistle blows) Team Gripball Team Gripball has similar
rules to other games played on the 40 by 30 metre field. What’s so different is that
each player catches the ball using a Velcro covered
pad which is strapped to their catching hand. Their preferred hand is
left free to throw the ball. The game is started by a
lateral or behind throw by the starting team. The idea is to advance up the field towards the opponents’ goal line. A goal is scored when
a pass is successfully caught by an attacking team member while standing inside the
opposition’s goal area. The rules are much the
same as Speed Ball really. The usual restrictions that
relate to the three by three rule are to be used. You can block, but there
is no contact allowed. If the ball is dropped, put out of play, or fouled on the goal line, the same rules as Speed Ball apply. (whistle blows) – Change over. (whistle blows) Play. Let’s have another look at those rules. One, three by three rule applies. No offside. Two, dropped ball, change possession. Three, ball over sideline, other team throws in. Four, if a goal attempt is missed, defender team throws in from goal line. Five, ball knocked over goal line, attacking team takes corner throw in. (whistle blows) Scoop Ball. Ah yes, this game involves
a funny looking scoop that can be also used as a hat it would seem. Scoop Ball is a junior version
of Sofcrosse played on a 40 by 30 metre field with a six a side. The game is really like
Gripball only you’re using different throw and catch equipment. Once you team has mastered the pass and catch with the scoop, the sport leader can start the game. Like most of the games, the idea is to get the ball over the other team’s base line to score a goal. A team member must catch
the ball on the full while standing in the
opposition’s goal area. How about those rules? Same as Team Gripball. (whistle blows) American Footy. Set up the playing area using the normal 40 by 30 metre field. As usual, yellow cones on each corner. White for halfway, and goals at both ends. In this example, we’ve
used green at one end red at the other end. There are two teams, six a side, wearing team vests and tag ribbons around the waist. After a brief explanation of the rules, there aren’t many. The referee is ready
to start the game with a normal kick off. (whistle blows) – Green kick. – [Voiceover] Oh, look a
big kick by the green team and we’re off. The reds have the ball and they’re heading for the touchdown line. Tagged. (whistle blows) – First down. – [Voiceover] Okay, a tag has been made. That calls for a scrimmage, but the reds still have possession. This is called a first down. The scrimmage looks like
this with the person who was tagged playing the ball. So we’re on to the first of
four possible scrimmages. The team with the ball
must score a touchdown within four scrimmages. If not, it’s a handover. A stellar throw! We have a touchdown! Congratulations. It doesn’t get much better than this, I’ll tell ya. Great touchdown there,
so now player will resume with a kick off by the green side. Okay, here’s a chance for the reds to get a second touchdown. Oh, not if you’re gonna do that! A dropped ball is called an incomplete, and the reds will lose possession. This now becomes the first
scrimmage for the greens. Can they do something with this? Oh, the green team gets straight into it. Already it’s a touchdown! (cheering) The reds get the new play
off with this mighty kick. Might need to use the
three by three rule here. He’s hard to catch this one, but finally he is tagged. Gotcha! Okay this is the first
scrimmage of the new play. Ball still with the greens. No not another dropped ball. Now the reds have possession. When passing the ball in a play, a team can only throw forward once, but sideways or backwards
as often as you like. A side pass is called a lateral. Well look at this. The score levelled at one all. Here’s the reds chance to stand
their authority on the game, and yes! It’s a touchdown! The reds ahead two to one. The reds are going off! Let’s have another look at those rules. One, use the three by
three rule so everyone gets a go. Two, four scrimmages per play before a turnover. Three, dropped ball, turnover. Four, only one forward pass per play. – [Voiceover] For more
information go to the Premier’s Sporting Challenge website at www.schools.nsw.edu.au/psc.

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