The Rules of Flickerball – THE WORST SPORT EVER INVENTED!

The Rules of Flickerball – THE WORST SPORT EVER INVENTED!

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Ninh explains, the Rules of Flickerball.
The object of the game is to score more points than the opposing team.
The game is played on a field that’s …. Erm … it can be any size field?
That can be of any size, and is played between two teams of … and there can be any number
of players? A minimum of two players per team. The ball
used in Flickerball can be an American Football, a soccer ball, a rugby ball, a dodgeball … basically
any ball will do. The game starts with a jump ball. The team
that receives the ball must only pass backwards or laterally initially. There are two ways
to move the ball towards the goal. You may move only three steps forward with
the ball, or be in possession of the ball whilst moving backwards or sideways for a
maximum of 5 seconds. After 5 seconds, you must either pass to a teammate or shoot the
ball towards the goal. To score points you must throw the ball into
the goal. These goals are situated at opposite ends of the field, and are 6ft above the ground.
They’re basically a piece of plywood with a hole cut out of the middle. I shit you not.
If you cannot afford a piece of plywood, using a stolen tire from your nearest ghetto is
acceptable. If you successfully shoot the ball into the
hole, this is a goal and is worth 2 points. And, if you miss the hole, but hit the plywood
surround – this is worth 1 point. The game is played in either one 40 minute
period, or two 20 minute halves. Highest score at the end of time, wins.
That’s not so bad? Well, sadly the rules get more complicated.
Any attempt at shooting at the goal results in the ball being awarded to the other team.
Whilst you are allowed to pass the ball to a teammate, if a pass is incomplete and not
caught, the ball is awarded to the other team. If a pass is deflected by a member of the
opposing team, it’s a free ball and anyone can take possession of it.
You cannot pass or shoot the ball in the free throw lane, which is apparently this area
here. If the ball leaves the area of play, the ball
is awarded to the team who did not touch it last.
Flickerball is designed to complicated. Flickerball is designed so that rules are
more important than the actual game itself. Flickerball is designed to be no fun whatsoever.
Flickerball is designed to suck. Designed. To Suck.
So why on earth would you play this game? The US Air force uses flickerball as a military
training exercise. They use it to evaluate cadets in stressful, confusing and high pressure
situations. All of which are present in this game due to its complicated rules, odd structure
of play, and the lack of consistency in both the rules and the format. Every move you make
on the field, is being evaluated by your superiors and should you suck at the sport that sucks,
this will reflect badly in your evaluations. No pressure then.
There’s just a few other things you’ll need to know before playing or watching Flickerball.
For example. Fouls.
Flickerball is a no contact sport, and these are considered as fouls.
Should you break one of the rules, a free throw is awarded to the other team at the
spot of the foul. Even swearing and protesting calls are considered
as fouls. Fuck. Heckling.
Members of the team who aren’t on the field (and any spectators watching) are allowed
to hurl abuse towards the players. This results in harsh American insults such as …
The players are not allowed to retaliate, doing so will result in a foul and the ball
is awarded to the other team. Variations.
Flickerball is not consistently played by the same rules across America. Each region
of the United States has its own variation of the rules. Some play with a three point
line, some play where they can only pass backwards or sideways and
…. Okay this is crazy. I’m not doing anymore. I should have renamed this video. Ninh can’t
explain: the Rules of Flickerball. Actually, yes I can – I just did. Ninh won’t explain
the Rules of Flickerball … because this sport is just shit stupid.
If you do like this kind of video where I’m ripping the crap out of stuff, let me know
in the comments section below. Special shout out to my guy Spencer Kassimir
for introducing me to this hilariously awful sport. Follow the guy on Twitter and if you
have actually enjoyed this video – please be sure to like share and subscribe. It really
does take me ages to make one of these things and good karma is very much appreciated.
Follow me on Twitter also and share this video on Reddit, but in the meantime …. Enjoy
Flickerball? Ninh Ly – www.ninh.co.uk – @NinhLyUK

100 thoughts on “The Rules of Flickerball – THE WORST SPORT EVER INVENTED!”

  1. It's not that confusing.
    The most weird part of the rules are the 3 steps maximum that a player with a ball can take.

  2. Seriously Ninh, since you've already explained Rugby Union, that Flickerball as a mix of Touch Rugby and Basketball shouldn't be so hard to understand or practise…

  3. Oh come on mate!!! Easy on the good old us of a!! You're welcome for wwii and this is the thanks we get?!! Kidding. All good buddy, keep up thegood work.

  4. So it's Practically like Big Ball in the cartoon network show Chowder, where the rules matter more than the game itself

  5. I don't get this video, I don't find the rules to be confusing and this is a game I would like to play. Am I the only one?

  6. I do like these kind of videos. Please do more (trying to) explaining the rules of ridiculous sports like this and Botaoshi!

  7. Flickerball, coming soon to Sky Sports Mix. Hey, if they think that the Netball Superleague is important to them, they'll love this.

  8. I’ve been inspired to make a sport that also pushes its players to the edge. As of now it’s just called Endurance. It takes place on a polo field and has 4 periods of 30 minutes. The center circle is a trampoline embedded in the ground. It is played with a rugby ball but hey, if you don’t have one of those you can always use a hockey puck. Basically the goal is to get the ball through the goal posts. Doing that is probably about 4 points or something. If anybody has some suggestions I’d like to hear them. This is meant to be a semi-serious sport.

  9. lol me and my friends invented flickerball before knowing about it we had almost the same rules made up in 5 minutes cuz our football was not inflated

  10. I loved the video and entertaining presentation. Thank you!!! Unfortunately, I cannot show it to my students due to the language. 🙁 But we are going to give Flickerball a chance to emerge as a favorite "worst sport ever"!

  11. Good series 🙂
    But it would be useful if you could include an example of a common scoring; is it like basketball(85-91) or scores like in football(3-2), to get a general feel.

  12. What?  I love playing it!  There are two main versions and they do have specific field dimensions, field markings, goal dimensions, number of player, number of referees, etc. The one designed to teach/evaluate cadets (United States Air Force Academy) or students (at some schools and universities) and the one with greatly reduced/simplified set of rules played for fun… yes, fun.  Matches among friends can be played on a field of any size with whatever number of players, that can be said of any non-official match of any sport.  I think that your evaluation is from a misinformed stand point.

  13. So it's a psychological experiment with some teamwork and physical components. Yep, sounds like the military to me.

  14. We play a variation called ultimate ball. It's basically football, just no tackling, and the person throwing it can't move. Other than that, fair game. Includes contact

  15. Wait, I'm genuinely confused. It just seems like a mix of basketball and ultimate frisbee. What's so bad about the rules proper? I get that getting heckled isn't great, but what about the rules are complicated?

  16. This actually doesn't sound too much different from Ultimate Frisbee, a game I have played before. I don't know if there are any set regulations about the number of players or the size of the field for that sport either.

    If I were to accurately sum up this sport in one sentence, I'd call it a cross between basketball and Ultimate Frisbee.

  17. We play this at my High School for PE.
    We use the Backboards of Basketball rims and make it that the glass is the only part where you can score, the outside edge does not count at all.
    You can also air dribble, but it has to go over your head every dribble
    And the best of all, the ball can be rebounded by any team, even if the ball is scored, so you can just go up, score, rebound, score again, and so on.
    Needless to say, the worst of people come out in this game and its glorious.

  18. Here's an idea (But it'll have to wait for next year, giving plenty of setup time)
    For an April Fools video, come up with a sport and its rules, have some people play it somewhere so you can get some video footage and pictures of it, then explain the rules of it. Since its a made up sport nobody's ever heard of, come up with some fake history behind it like it was invented by Eskimos in Greenland of something like that.

  19. Our football coaches in middle school had us play a variation of this game. Coach Alford called it “Army Football” and it was fairly similar, except there was no hoops, we just used the end zones of our practice field for “touchdowns.” We always used a football, when your team had possession, you could throw it in any direction you wanted, and when caught you could run as much as you wanted until you were tagged. Brings back memories 😪

  20. Hahahahahahahahaha, that's the most head scrunching, mind blending game that I've ever (and in the 44 year of life, that's saying alot) came across.

  21. Do the rules of wall ball.!!
    You know what, nevermind i just looked it up and i guess we played more of a "Ghetto" wallball when we were younger… It involved any hand size ball, tennis or racket balls and you have to catch with one hand. If you failed catching it or it bounces off you in anyway you had to run and touch the wall before anyone else grabbed the ball and threw it and hit you. If you made it to the wall in time, all good game keeps going but if you were hit then you have one of two choices. You can sit out or stand facing the wall and get pegged twice by person that got you out.. If you threw the ball out of play area you were pegged and if you wanna leave early you had to be pegged out… Either then that it boiled down to tricking other players into messing up the catch.. Was really no teams or time limit with us, no score either just play till you get like getting pegged OUT..

  22. I’m a proud God fearing American, the best kind of American, a Texan, and I can tell you I’ve never seen or heard about this waste of time “sport.” So please, people of Earth, some Americans are dumb but no one over here plays this game. We’re not that dumb….at least not in Texas.

  23. Would love to see you do a video on the "sport" of fowling (long "O", as it's bowling with an American football). Starting to become a popular drinking/bar game in the US Midwest.

  24. I would play this as a school yard fuck around sport if I have literally nothing else to do with my life. Fairly simple. Especially when you just get rid of all the rules. Rugby, ultimate frisby, and handball mixed into one. As a pro sport, hell nah. As just fucking around, I'd do it.

  25. This looks like one of those games they substituted in PE for dodgeball when parents complained about the constant black eyes and welts.

  26. I'm confused, the rules don't actually seem that complicated (except with the regional variations noted but not really elaborated upon), but one of the main basic rules you did cover seemed to be that passes must be backwards or lateral — what explains all the forward passes that seem to be in the footage? I played rugby through college and after, so I know how a ball can advance by running onto a lateral pass, even with just a few forward steps per touch, but some of the included footage just seems to have straight-up forward passes…? Enjoying this series of sports explained!

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